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Distinguishing the Desire to Learn from the Desire to Perform: The Social Value of Achievement Goals

Abstract : We sought to distinguish mastery goals (i.e., desire to learn) from performance goals (i.e., desire to achieve more positive evaluations than others) in the light of social judgment research. In a pilot study, we made a conceptual distinction between three types of traits (agency, competence, and effort) that are often undifferentiated. We then tested the relevance of this distinction for understanding how people pursuing either mastery or performance goals are judged. On self perception, results revealed that effort was predicted by the adoption of mastery goals, and agency by performance goals (study 1). On judgments, results showed that (1) the target pursuing mastery goals was perceived as oriented towards effort and (2) the target pursuing mastery goals was oriented towards agency (study 2). Finally, these links were shown again by participants who infered a target's goals from his traits (study 3). Results are discussed in terms of the social value of achievement goals at school.;
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https://hal-univ-paris10.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01473222
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Submitted on : Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 4:54:07 PM
Last modification on : Tuesday, May 5, 2020 - 11:50:15 AM

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Joanna Cohen, Céline Darnon, Patrick Mollaret. Distinguishing the Desire to Learn from the Desire to Perform: The Social Value of Achievement Goals. Journal of Social Psychology, Taylor & Francis (Routledge), 2016, pp.1-17. ⟨10.1080/00224545.2016.1152216⟩. ⟨hal-01473222⟩

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