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Continuity and Discontinuity in the Shephela (Israel) between the Late Chalcolithic and the Early Bronze I: The Modi'in "Deep Deposits" Ceramic Assemblages as a Case Study

Abstract : Modi’in, located in the centre of Israel, is one of the rare sites presenting a sequence of occupations covering the end of the 5th millenium and the first half of the 4th millennium BC. The technological study of the ceramic assemblages enables us to re-examine the difficult question of continuity and/ or discontinuity between the Late Chalcolithic and the earliest Early Bronze Age I cultures in this region. Results show that between the end of the Late Chalcolithic and the beginning of the Early Bronze Age I, there is continuity in the ways of making utilitarian vessels, but discontinuity in the ways of fashioning ceremonial vessels. Moreover, a new functional category of ceramics appears characteristic for the region and whose properties bring them closer to those of ceremonial vessels. Those features argue in favour of both a phylogenetic link between Northern Negev Ghassulian populations and people living in the Shephela (the western piedmont of the Judea-Samaria incline), and a reorganisation of those societies during a transitional period, including the post-Ghassulian (Late Chalcolithic 2) and the very beginning of the Early Bronze Age I.
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https://hal-univ-paris10.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01548581
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Submitted on : Friday, June 8, 2018 - 5:04:04 PM
Last modification on : Thursday, March 5, 2020 - 3:40:52 PM

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Valentine Roux, Edwin C.M. Brink, Sariel Shalev, Edwin van den Brink. Continuity and Discontinuity in the Shephela (Israel) between the Late Chalcolithic and the Early Bronze I: The Modi'in "Deep Deposits" Ceramic Assemblages as a Case Study. Paléorient, CNRS, 2013, 39 (1), pp.63-81. ⟨10.3406/paleo.2013.5487⟩. ⟨hal-01548581⟩

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