La carte et le texte, une lecture géographique des "Rochers errants" (Ulysse, de Joyce, chapitre 10)

Abstract : James Joyce's Ulysses is deeply linked to the geographical reality of Dublin. Yet, aside from street names, the text offers up very few topographical details. A study of chapter 10, the most city-centered of the book, shows how mapping and writing are related. This chapter is made of separate narrative fragments, and can't be fully understood by reading them in sequence. Different places are shown simultaneously, as when viewing a map, thus highlighting the differences between grasping a place through a map and through a literary description.
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https://hal-univ-paris10.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01640542
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Submitted on : Monday, November 20, 2017 - 6:28:43 PM
Last modification on : Wednesday, July 4, 2018 - 11:14:09 PM

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Henri Desbois. La carte et le texte, une lecture géographique des "Rochers errants" (Ulysse, de Joyce, chapitre 10). Espace Geographique, Éditions Belin, 2016, Tome 45 (4), pp.355--367. ⟨hal-01640542⟩

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